Best Practices

puzzle pieces
3 Pieces of Content Your Car Dealership Needs Today

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Let me ask you this: What content is your dealership creating every day? More often than not when I ask that question I get pulled into conversations about which social media platform is best, which distribution method dealerships should be using to spread the word about themselves, or even whether video, photos, or written content does a better job stopping the scroll. What happens much less often is that I get to have a conversation about the message. What’s the story they want to tell? Facebook & TikTok. Email & YouTube. Radio & TV. Blog posts & matchbook covers.  Nothing wrong with any of them. Use ‘em all, but they’re all just tools to get your message on the inside of your customers’ heads. How the message gets there isn’t anywhere near as important as what that message is. The message is what matters. If you want to create better, more engaging, conversation-starting content, you have to tell a better story. Telling a better story starts with deciding what story you want to tell, then creating more content that spreads that message regardless of format or delivery platform.  A great story can be told in many ways, in many formats, on many platforms. A great story transcends. Community The greatest stories that your dealership can tell,  The stories that will resonate best with your target market, The stories that will bring you the most likes, clicks, shares, smiley face emojis, actual real live conversations with real live people, and yes, more sales, In those stories, you’re not the hero; you’re the sidekick. You’re not Batman; you’re Robin. Look for opportunities to create content that shines a light on other people in your community. “Look for your people, and lift them up,” says business strategist Sherman Mohr. For years, I’ve been encouraging salespeople and managers to attend Toastmasters or Dale Carnegie training to improve their communication skills. In How To Win Friends and Influence People, Carnegie says we can make it easy for other people to like us when we go out of our way to make them feel important. Create more content that does that! Full profiles of your employees , not just the sales department. Spotlights about your customers’ businesses.   Features about local sports teams from sandlot baseball to the major leagues.  Active participation in community events. The next time someone comes in asking you to donate $500 to some local charitable, civic, or sports organization, don’t just write the check. Show up and help. Use your dealership’s digital footprint to help them spread the word. Get your team out in the community belly-to-belly with the people and then Tell That Story. Use Video and pictures to put more faces on Facebook.  Write a blog post for your website to boost your SEO.  Share it on your Google My Business page.   In his book Marketing Revolution , Mark Schaeffer says that in today’s media-saturated market with today’s media-savvy consumers, the businesses that present the most human messages and stories will be the businesses that thrive. Be more human. Commerce Rule #1 is “It Ain’t About You!” It’s about them, and specifically, it’s about how you can help them. The single greatest thing about the car business is that almost every single human being you’ve ever met has, wants, or needs a car. They’ve got 99 problems and their car is definitely one! Create content that tells the story of how you can help solve their car problems. The best way to do that is to show how you’ve solved other people’s car problems. Post Videos of happy customers saying how you went out of your way to find them the perfect car. Post photographs from the service department showing your new Express and after-hours lanes. And get more written reviews from customers, sales customers, service customers, stopped-by-on-my-way-home-to-get-a-free-ice-cream-cone customers. Customer reviews are the gold medal, brass ring, heavyweight champion of the content marketing world. You can tell your story all day long, but when your customers start singing the same song that’s when a story becomes a brand. Ask And You Get; Don’t and You Won’t. It’s the first thing they tell you in Sales 101; you have to ask for the order. Your dealership is in business to generate business. Create revenue. Nothing says commitment like money changing hands. If you’re not even asking for the money, less of it is going to change hands. In the official social media official playbook Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook! , Gary Vaynerchuk likens your social media calendar is like a prizefight with friendly, entertaining, community based or other ostensibly non-commercial content serving as the left jabs that lower defenses and leave an opening for the knock out punch. Asking for the order. Making it easy for them to take action. Making them an offer they can’t refuse. Promising them a car buying experience they’ll never forget. Everybody loves a deal. Create more content that gives them a deal. Then look them dead in the eye and ask for the order - call, click or come on down.
man drawing umbrella over car
Auto Dealers: What’s Your Total Cost of Risk (TCOR)?

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Financial statements track how you are doing financially every month. Consider measuring and benchmarking TCOR as a part of your ongoing financial statement process.   What is TCOR and why should you care about your dealership’s Total Cost of Risk (TCOR)?  Business is about keeping the money you make. Your sales and gross profits could be at record highs, but your losses might be, as well. Unless you are tracking TCOR, your money may be walking out the back door because of losses or customer problems. Consider changing the way the dealership accounts for losses at the store (TCOR).    The only way to improve in any area is to measure it and benchmark it. TCOR is a metric used to evaluate your dealership’s internal risk process. Here is how it’s calculated: Insurance premiums + self-insured losses + losses associated with lower profits and productivity + risk administrative expenses (internal & external) = Total Cost of Risk (TCOR)  Tracking this metric will help you laser focus on which parts of the dealership cost you money. Consider customizing and defining each aspect of the formula to specify the guidelines for your dealership. These guidelines will be different for every owner-operator. It’s important to be consistent in how you establish and execute the accounting at your dealership based on those guidelines. Consistency will produce accurate data leading to meaningful answers.  Here’s an example: Let’s say you sell vehicles to people who have credit challenges (secondary customers). In my experience, if you “spot” them in their vehicles, and then cannot get them financed for whatever reason, they tend to write more negative online reviews. Hopefully, you have a process at the dealership to bring them back in and try to satisfy them in some way.   (If not, start today. Most lawsuits and regulatory problems start with upset customers. In fact, a dealership in Tennessee recently had its license revoked after multiple claims of deceptive acts. Now, the owner has been convicted of twenty-one (21) felony counts. His problems all started with customer complaints. Pro Tip: After you have satisfied the customers’ concerns, ask them to “update” their review. If you ask them to “change” their review, the customers will feel manipulated, Then, it will look like the only reason you helped them was to have them update the online review.) If you tracked the personnel time and all other expenses associated with these types of issues, you would be able to determine the actual cost of taking care of these customers. This is only one aspect of TCOR. (Please refer to the formula above.) If the dealership accounts for these costs accurately, it means you can no longer hide these losses in “Other Income.” In many dealerships, “Other Income” becomes the “garbage pail” of accounts, where you charge expenses, so the managers who are paid on gross won’t complain about chargebacks.    Using the secondary customer example above - whether or not TCOR is being tracked - we can discuss which policies and procedures can be put into place to stop these types of losses. There are plenty! We will not know the effectiveness of the procedures unless the numbers are tracked accurately. Recently, I have been hearing dealers espouse a case of the “yets.”   “I haven’t been sued yet.” “I have not heard from a regulator, yet” “We haven’t had any major problems, yet.” So, I don’t need to track TCOR…  Depending on the accounting controls at the store, the losses may be bigger than you realize. Unless you are measuring these costs, it is unknowable how much money is being poured into issues at your dealership. Do you really know your risk costs? Reputational losses? Customer satisfaction charges? Please consider tracking and measuring these numbers moving forward.  I’ll bet you’ll be glad you did. 
crisis
Risk Avoidance – Ignored

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Are you too busy selling cars to pay attention to the myriad number of lurking problems and issues that you haven’t had time to address? You would like to correct them and don’t know where to start?   Let today be the day you start. First, don’t be the businessperson and entrepreneur who doesn’t pay any attention to the “what ifs.” What if happens! A lot, in fact. Don’t avoid the risk. Start by being aware that risk is out there and everywhere. Sometimes you see it and sometimes you don’t! Unearthing unknown problems is a process and is heavy lifting. Rest assured there are steps you can take now to be a pro. Here are eight (8) action items you can start today to reduce your operational risks. Consider Doing An Enterprise Risk Assessment Doing an enterprise risk assessment means that you should examine all aspects of your operation for problems and what ifs. This is an on-going process and (1) is not accomplished overnight, and (2) should be a part of your monthly routines.  Here’s a starter checklist: 1. Is someone designated to find, respond, and resolve internet complaints? (If you are asking why you should waste resources on this, consider this internet posting example I found on a review site for a client: “If you are reading this and went through something similar at this ***** hole, email me at @***.com and I will be glad to talk with you.” This is exactly how class action lawsuits begin. Although, this is a huge exposure, it’s easily solved as a straight-forward daily task that someone must be responsible for and bring to conclusion.)   2. Do you know what to do if/when you get served with a lawsuit or an inquiry from a regulator? (Now is the time to formulate a proactive plan, not when you are under time pressure. If you have not had a problem here, consider yourself lucky. Not being pessimistic, but it’s an eventuality. This is not as simple as turning it over to your regular lawyer. Unless they are well versed in consumer law, they may not be qualified to respond. This is the worst situation because they will give you bad advice and you will likely act on it. That makes a bad condition even worse. I’ve seen it a lot and it’s ugly, expensive, and time consuming.) 3. When was the last time you had someone independently check your website for advertising compliance to ensure all advertising laws are being met? (Are you unknowingly using bait and switch advertising? How you read and/or changed your disclaimers to reflect today’s advertising requirements? Recently, I reviewed a dealership’s websites and quickly found seven (7) violations within a three (3) hour quick view. Each and every mistake was actionable by an attorney, regulator, Attorney General, the FTC, or the CFPB (you get the picture here). Several mistakes made the dealer vulnerable to Unfair and Deceptive Acts and Practices (UDAP) laws under which the potential damages are tripled. Tripled! Plus, if sued, the dealer would be liable for the consumer’s attorney’s fees, which will be substantial. $70,000 - $80,000 is not an unusual number, sometimes it’s more. This is a disaster easily avoided by having a third party check your ad content regularly. This should be a regular monthly check as you change your advertising frequently.) 4. Gotcha! The local television news van shows up and wants to do a story about a customer’s broken vehicle that you (personally) don’t even know about. What do you do?   (Do you have a media policy? Do your employees know what to do or where to direct the reporter?  The dealership should have a written media policy signed by each and every employee with a clear delineation about who is authorized to speak to the media. Usually, by the time the news crew arrives, the station already has the customer “in the can,” i.e. the customer’s interview has already been recorded and approved by the station manager. So, the only thing left is for the news crew to interview you on camera and get your side of the story. Sometime, stories can be stopped with facts but you have to be prepared and know how you are going to handle these situations. PRO TIP: Do not ever submit a written comment on your letterhead. Then, everyone who sees the story on television sees your logo with the response! That’s not helping your reputation.) 5. The Internal Revenue Service arrives wanting to talk about IRS Cash Reporting requirements. Are you ready?   (This has nothing to do with income tax. This is how you report customer “cash” transactions to the IRS in compliance with their regulations. Fines for willful non-compliance can be up to $5.5 million and up to five (5) years in jail. Did you know that a traveler’s check is cash? Did you know that a cashier’s check for $10,000 and under is considered cash? Do you have a written policy about how your dealership handles this issue? Did you send the customer a letter at the end of the year indicating that you filed a Form 8300 with the IRS? Big liability here. Get on it.) 6. A mechanic is driving a unit that loses steering or the brakes. It careens into your used oil tank which begins leaking and is running toward the drain. Do you have a plan for this? (First, do you have a written spill plan? Have all of your employees signed off on it? Remember in our business, if it’s not in writing, it doesn’t exist. It’s very difficult to keep up with all the pollution and environmental regulations. Do you have pollution insurance to cover a spill? Did you know you can be personally liable for this type of accident? What happens if your waste oil vendor dumps your used oil in the river? Do they have insurance to cover you? Are you tracking the insurance of your vendor? These “what ifs” get messy, quickly.) 7. A regulator shows up and asks to see your training records on xxx. What do you give them? (Twice-monthly training for your employees is considered “best practices.” Even more importantly, when you train, you must have employees “sign off” on the training materials. Then, you demonstrate to the regulator by providing your training materials with the employee’s signature. If you can prove an attempt to get it right, the regulator will generally be more lenient with you. If you appear to totally disregard this particular area of compliance, then buckle your seatbelt. If a regulator arrives at your dealership, generally they won’t leave without you writing them a check. The question is whether that check will be a few thousand dollars or a “5” or “6” figure check. Oh, and do you have any insurance which might cover these instances?) 8. You receive a “charge” from an employee who goes to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) claiming that there’s an atmosphere of sexual harassment and discrimination. Now what? (First, have you considered having insurance to cover this type of claim? Second, do you have an Employee Guidebook that has policies on how to cover these issues? If you do not, you leave yourself wide open and vulnerable.) So, there are eight (8) actionable items for you to consider. Ignore these at your own peril because when one bites, you’ll hurt.  
winning team
Cultivating a Winning Sales Team

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When your dealership hits its sales goals, profitability and morale run high. Life at your dealership is energized, employees are engaged and looking forward for the future. Success like this doesn’t just happen by accident. It occurs through intentionally hiring and developing a top-notch sales team. It happens when you have the right salespeople in the right roles with the aptitude and propensity to perform in the fast-paced retail environment in a thriving culture that supports their success. Let’s explore how to cultivate the sales team you need for your store to enjoy lasting prosperity. The Cost of an Ineffective Sales Team Before we dive into the strategy to assemble a winning sales team, we need to face a hard truth. An ineffective sales team will keep you from reaching revenue targets and could ultimately devastate the dealership financially. Failing to sell enough vehicles or RO’s obviously hurts the bottom line - and is, sadly, more common than you may think. According to HubSpot, two-thirds of sales associates miss the mark. But did you also know that your company will spend an average of $65,000 and six months on replacing each sales consultants or advisors that leaves the dealership? In general, most sales representatives wash out of your dealership because they lacked one (or more) of several things: motivation, connection, sales skills, training, recognition, guidance, or product knowledge. Here’s what you can do about it. Establish a Sales Culture There’s a lot of literature out there that supports the benefits of a good dealership culture. Your sales team should have its own. It doesn’t have to be fancy. A short statement of the values your team shares works just fine. Be sure it’s not just words on the training room wall. Engage your sales team in identifying and agreeing upon which values matter most to them and what behaviors support them. You’ll want to all agree and uphold the values with standards and expectations that differentiate your dealership’s brand, the client experience and ultimately support the vision of your future success. Your sales culture will help align everyone on the team and keep members motivated. The shared values and defined standards will ensure a more consistent experience for your customers. You and your team should do everything in accordance with the sales culture you establish, and members of the sales team should share openly and hold each other accountable to your established values. When stress piles up, and numbers are hard to hit, values are often pushed aside; especially if they’re viewed as just words on paper. As the leader, set the tone to make it OK for all to hold each other accountable for upholding these values and speaking up when things go off track. Hire Intentionally Using your sales culture, think about the ideal sales representative. Write your job description and advertisement based on that ideal. Of course, you may need to be flexible so that you’re not endlessly chasing unicorns, (you know the one – that twenty-car guy that is miraculously available). Hire with intention and with a plan, so there’s a greater chance of culture fit and sales success. As you consider what your next hires need to look like, take a close look at your existing sales team and your customers to determine what gaps you need to fill. What personality traits or specific skills will take your team to the next level? I encourage all my dealerships to use a hiring assessment to accurately gauge fit and get a look under the hood. I recommend The Omnia Group’s hiring assessment. They have a suite of automotive job profiles that assess candidate fit and help you avoid bad hires.  John F. Kennedy once said a rising tide lifts all boats. He was speaking about the economy. I believe this applies to sales teams too. Every person you hire should bring something new to your mix that takes the whole team up a notch, this may mean giving up on what I affectionately call the “Retreads” and the crazy flooding of the floor. Let’s all recall the famous Albert Einstein quote about the definition of insanity and stop doing it the way you’ve always done—it’s time for some innovative hiring strategies. Onboard Thoroughly Your new sales consultants will need lots of personal attention early on to set them up for success, especially in today’s market. Customers are coming to the dealership wielding a ton of knowledge, so don’t send your sales rep to the gunfight with a just butter knife. Equip them with the skills and confidence to best represent your store. Besides the typical HR steps, your onboarding should include: A review of the sales culture, values, and standards and how it impacts the sales process In-depth training on the brand, vehicles, CRM, DMS and processes A discussion about their individual goals and clarity around the proactive daily activities that will help them achieve results Introductions and personal connections to ensure they feel comfortable and part of the team A cadence of scheduled check-ins with their manager to provide on-going support once they are active on the floor A thorough onboarding helps new sales associates feel welcome and engaged. It also gets them familiar with what they’re selling and how they’re expected to sell it. Provide Ongoing Training and Mentorship All that time you spend onboarding your new hires can quickly go out the door if you don’t provide an on-going method for training, skill development and coaching.  84% of sales training is forgotten in the first 3 months . Robust onboarding lays a solid foundation, but it’s not enough. You must provide ongoing training and mentorship to keep your sales team growing. Your training and development plan should include: Group training to reiterate basic but essential sales skills - and introduce new ones.   Improve learning with DAILY simulation practice of inbound and outbound calls and sales situations to ensure the word tracks are natural and you are not losing any opportunities. (Bonus: Drastically increase conversions!) Private 1:1 coaching to work on specific sales situations and issues and provide feedback.  Mentorship opportunities for seasoned players to share best practices with new members of the team, make this a part of the career path to management.  Encouragement to seek development opportunities outside of the dealership, either through your manufacturer, vendor partners, workshops, or many of the online courses available. Establish a cadence of daily sales huddles to share wins, discuss challenges, and set short term goals and focus points. Also, take the time to hold regular cross-functional meetings with sales, BDC and service advisors to discuss upcoming customer appointments, how to optimize the experience and acquired more trade-ins to support inventory deficits. Providing an environment of on-going communication and cross development gives everyone an opportunity to grow in their role, while building a team climate of shared goals and focus and eliminate our infamous department silos. Give Regular, Detailed Feedback Your sales associates need to know what they’re doing right so they can do more of it - and what they’re doing wrong so they change it. That insight comes from your regular, detailed feedback. Make it a point to speak to each sales representative on a set schedule of one-on-one's and build plenty of opportunity for sales call observation and review. Build out time in one-on-one's that goes beyond reviewing deals and pipeline health. Use these meetings to also establish and review development goals – both personal and professional. This is your time to get to know what inspires and motivates every sales rep and can also help uncover what’s getting in their way whether it be a skill or mindset gap. Recognize Accomplishments When an individual sales associate or the entire team does well, celebrate it. Show them that you're proud of them and appreciate their contribution. Recognition will make them feel good and motivate them to replicate that feeling by achieving more success. Be sure to understand what type of recognition motivates each individual. Some reps are motivated by group praise and all-company recognition while others would rather shrink under a rug if that happened to them. Sending a personal handwritten note can go just as far with one individual as a shout out during the morning meeting Final Thoughts Your sales team drives the financial success of your dealership. To have an effective selling machine, you must identify the right talent, put it where it will thrive, continue to develop it and engage their very best performance. The leader is the thermostat that sets the climate for the sales team, cultivates the growth of the team and the inspires the success of each sales rep. Commitment to establishing these practices creates the soil and foundation for your team to hit goals and thrive together now and far into the future.
team management
8 Management Techniques to Maximize Employee Engagement

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Is Your Team Engaged?  Employee engagement is a critical issue for most dealerships. Engagement is the level of involvement, enthusiasm and commitment and employee feels toward their job and workplace. Today’s atmosphere offers so many distractions that can keep your team from focusing on the works that is before them.  There are three types of employees – the engaged, the unengaged, and the discontented. According to our last poll of 130,000 dealership employees, about 24% of employees are engaged in their work, meaning that they’re emotionally committed to getting the job done well and putting in the full effort.  That same poll shows that about 38% of employees are unengaged, meaning that they are satisfied with their positions, but aren’t really invested in the dealership’s vision or goals. These employees do just enough to meet the minimum requirements of their job. The remaining 38% of the workforce is discontented and disengaged, meaning they may be sabotaging your success.   To ensure that their team is happy and challenged, my best advice is to keep an open mind, an empathetic ear, and clear channels of communication. The level of engagement that an individual exhibits is often tied to how much they feel empowered, trusted, inspired and valued by their leader.   Let’s look at eight techniques for maximizing engagement:  1) Set challenging but realistic goals Allowing people to work within their comfort zone leads to complacency that kills engagement. Get creative and inspire them to take on new projects, set new goals, or learn new skills. More importantly, get them to let go of “the way we always did it”.  Leaders must challenge individuals and teams to see a new vision and push them whenever possible to do and be better Employees who are challenged with new projects, new goals and new skills need more coaching and cheerleading to make them realize they are truly capable of achieving more! 2) Everyone wants to be recognized for what they bring to the table! Recognize good work and praise people in front of the rest of the team with a shoutout in a team meeting, text, email, or on your dealership Facebook or LinkedIn page. A pat on the back makes individuals feel good about themselves and encourages others to step up if they know they’ll be rewarded with social recognition. BONUS – It also promotes your employment brand, helping recruit new candidates.   3) Track productivity but empower employees and avoid micromanaging Empowering individuals tells them you trust them, which increases engagement and performance. It is a powerful thing when employees believe in their manager, it is even more powerful when a manager believes in their people. Trust is the core of all high-performance cultures.   4) Make it easy and comfortable for your team to communicate Keep lines of communication open and encourage team members to come to you with concerns or roadblocks. When team members don’t feel comfortable speaking openly and honestly with one another, issues don’t get resolved and tension can lead to problematic outcomes. A sobering discussion I have when coaching leaders is when they score poorly on our employee engagement question “Departments in this dealership communicate well and work together as a team”. Avoid all of this by checking in with your employees regularly and giving them an outlet to voice their issues. 5) Prove that employees have a voice   It’s one thing to talk the talk, but when claiming that their feedback is important, you have to walk the walk, too! Send out anonymous surveys and polls. To get a better idea of how your team is responding to company culture, workload, and the direction that you’re headed. This allow employees to voice concerns without fear of retribution.  I also encourage you to ask for feedback from small groups or one-on-one. I provide my managers with a list of questions that we use for “Coffee and Convos” to start meaningful conversations and uncover new solutions and ideas to improve both culture and processes. 6) Respect that different people have different learning styles Not everyone can sit through online manufacturer training and get the information they need to work with our customers with confidence. Some people need one-on-one instruction; others need visuals; others need to just jump in and get started. Provide a hybrid of learning opportunities and upgrade your skills at coaching and teaching. 7) Take time to really check-in Workdays get hectic in the dealership and everyone has a tight schedule. It’s critical that teams make time to catch up and check-in with one another. Even if it’s just a quick five-minute huddle to share progress, learn a new skill or tip, or review a company value. Communication fuels connectivity and fosters a sense of togetherness, so don’t let it slip! 8) Embrace change If this last year has taught us anything, you must foster a team culture prepared to roll with the punches by being open to change. If someone leaves your team, how will you move forward? If a customer wants to take delivery at home, how will you make that happen? If anyone is too invested in how things should be, you might be missing out on how great things could be! Employee engagement is built on growth, communication, purpose, relationships, integrity, two-way commitment and trust. When done well, it improves the dealership and individual performance, increases the chance of success for managers, drives retention, and dramatically increases productivity. 
The Big Buzz in Digital Retailing: Dealer Ultimate Milestones

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Everyone in the car business is talking, writing, and podcasting about digital retailing. The list of related virtual events is exhaustive. The popularity momentum is depicted when planning a Google Ads campaign with keywords such as "automotive digital retailing," "digital retailing," and "modern retailing." Google's Keyword Planner shows a month-over-month increase of these keyword searches for the past 24 months. When forecasting your Google Ads budget, you can expect to pay upwards of $35 per click for an average 1.5 ad position. Automotive digital retailing is absolutely on everyone's mind. Transparency, Trust, & Time Savings As you weed through the mass content, several ideals are dominant: Transparency Building trust A streamlined sales process A seamless online to in-showroom experience First and foremost is giving consumers more control of the car buying experience. The ability to search on a dealer's website for vehicles by year, make, model, and type and to explore different configurations is a given. It's essential to accurately display vehicle pricing, factory rebates and incentives, special offers, dealer fees, financing options, a credit estimator and application, and a tool to formulate payment scenarios. Multi-channel options for requesting information, getting a guaranteed cash offer on a trade, and scheduling a test drive while enabling consumers to complete their entire car purchase online with flexible pick-up and delivery options – are all must-have components of any digital retailing strategy. It makes sense that this level of transparency builds trust with shoppers, leads to significant time savings, reduces friction, and results in a more favorable car buying experience. Why Achieving FULL Transparency Is the Ultimate Milestone for Dealers Let's think about what "transparency" really means... total visibility, crystal clear, open to observation, without concealment.  While digital retailing components play a critical role in creating a transparent online shopping environment,  full transparency is achieved when dealers openly display ALL vehicle and dealership information within the digital retailing framework , which saves shoppers even more time and builds a greater level of trust. As consumers move through the car buying journey, there are hundreds of digital interactions across social channels, video platforms, search engines, industry portals, manufacturer websites, and online review sites. Digital Air Strike's 8th Annual Automotive Digital Retailing Consumer Trends Study revealed the following about 7,500+ car buyers and service customers: 60%+ selected a dealership based on online reviews alone 54% said that community involvement influenced their decision to buy from a dealership 51% used Google to find dealership reviews Only 5% of dealerships shopped sent videos in response to customer inquiries 27% preferred to select vehicle warranty and add-ons online 93% of car buyers spent a few days or more researching which dealership to buy from When it comes to achieving transparency in automotive digital retailing, there's more to it than simply integrating a digital retailing solution into dealership vehicle details pages (VDPs).  Imagine car shoppers landing on VDPs that contain all the information they are looking for – not just vehicle photos and specs, financial tools, contact forms, and pricing. What if shoppers could watch videos introducing the service department and the General Manager, explore Google and DealerRater reviews, read about a VIP program, and learn about the dealership's community involvement. Why are shoppers forced to hunt for reviews on search engines and to browse through website pages to learn about the service department, community work, or special programs that are offered? Since most of a dealer's digital budget is spent driving traffic to VDPs, having car shoppers leave to find the information they need – is the last thing a dealer should want. Start Here Think about the process that you would go through to purchase a used vehicle. Before you get to the point of needing financial tools to build payment scenarios or obtain financing, you would spend time figuring out if a particular vehicle is the right choice by looking at vehicle photos and specifications AND by asking questions: Is the vehicle factory certified? What are the results of the inspection? What repairs or maintenance did the dealership perform? Does it need repairs?  Is the history report clean? What info is on the OEM window sticker? What kind of warranty does it have?  Is there a return policy? Is there a live video walkaround? How difficult would it be for an online car shopper to get the answers to these questions? How many phone calls would need to be made? How many forms filled out? How long would the consumer have to wait in the dealership for a salesperson to gather this information? A truly transparent website VDP contains ALL the information that shoppers need in one place - not just vehicle photos, specs, and financial tools. A high-impact VDP contains a vehicle's reconditioning records, inspection report, factory window sticker, vehicle history report, dealership reviews, video walkaround, ebrochure, and videos and documents that illustrate the dealership's reputation. Providing online shoppers with a "portfolio" of the dealership, the vehicle, and digital retailing components is the ultimate milestone in transparency and trust. Doing so saves shoppers hours of research, reduces painful price negotiations, streamlines the process, and makes the transition to the dealership seamless.  The Value Benefits Full transparency offers enormous benefits for dealers as well, such as building value in a vehicle by openly discussing the dealership's reconditioning investment or an inspection performed by a master certified technician. Value-based conversations with shoppers about vehicle quality and safety, and a lower cost-of-ownership over time helps to justify pricing and demonstrates that the dealer is truly interested in helping the shopper make a smart purchase decision.  In the end, it's a win-win situation for both the dealership and the car buyer – by focusing on selling value, the dealership retains its gross profit. At the same time, full transparency earns trust and drives customer loyalty.