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Leadership & Management
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Why Diversity, Equity and Inclusion are Key to Dealership Success

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Q&A with Wil Lewis, Experian’s chief diversity, equity, and inclusion officer Like many industries, the automotive industry has seen an increased—and much needed—focus on diversity in recent years. Why much needed? Consider this: Women make up 47% of the total workforce in the U.S., but only 18% of employees at automotive dealers.  While gender diversity is an important part of the diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) conversation, it’s just that—apart. DEI is much more than a single factor. And, it’s mission-critical for your dealership’s success.  To better understand what DEI encompasses, how to intentionally bring the needed focus into your dealership team, and why it’s key for success, I talked with Wil Lewis, Experian’s chief diversity, equity, and inclusion officer, whose responsibility is to ensure Experian’s programs and products reflect the employees, clients, and communities we serve and is a workplace where employees feel comfortable bringing their whole selves to work. Amy Hughes: Thanks for taking the time to chat, Wil! Can you tell us how you define diversity?  Wil Lewis: First, and foremost, we need to look at diversity through a more nuanced lens. Intentionally expanding our circles needs to be about more than just representation and focus on additional topics. When I define diversity, I often use four distinct terms: diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging.  Diversity equals representation. For example, how many women or veterans do we have working for our organization? How many people of color? We actually do need to count the numbers.   Equity is removing systemic barriers that stop any one of those marginalized populations from reaching their greatest success. An example of a barrier could be an assessment test that you have to take to reach a certain position that isn’t accessible to a person with a disability. Equity means ensuring that items like that in our systems and processes are cleared away.  Inclusion is inviting folks to the table. But not just inviting them, ensuring they’re engaged in the conversations happening. Belonging is the underpinning of it all. Once you’ve invited that person to the table, ensuring they have a voice, equal opportunity to speak and to be heard. This means their opinion and feedback is something that is sought after.  AH: What I love about breaking down those terms is that it doesn’t focus on a single underrepresented population, it’s everyone. Why is this important for the business to continue to be profitable and achieve your goals? WL: When we think about why DEI is important, it’s because our society is diverse. Our businesses and dealerships need to be reflective of society as a whole. This will likely impact their revenue and bottom line. Think about sales. If you walk into a dealership as a veteran, and the person you’re talking to also happens to be a veteran, then you can share stories about your time in basic training or other experiences, and that instantly builds a relationship. And that’s ultimately what sales is about: relationships. As we work to build our businesses, dealerships, etc. we want to ensure they have a diverse population so they can relate to their customers. Not having that kind of representation can mean your dealership can lose a competitive edge.  AH: If we recognize that representation is not where it should be in our dealerships, what steps can we take to become more diverse? Often, dealerships pass from generation to generation, so diversity may not be top of mind. WL: Here’s what’s key: The owner will always be the owner, and for some dealerships, the owner may often be a member of the family. I see this in my local dealership. But, that doesn’t mean the leadership team is fixed.  You can ask yourself, who’s your finance manager? Who does your inventory? There’s still an opportunity to diversify your leadership team. And, if you’re really good, you look at who’s on your sales floor, and you pull them up. Look for opportunities to promote from within. Research shows that diversifying leadership is strategic for your bottom line. A study by Gartner found that 75% of companies with diverse and inclusive decision-making teams will exceed their financial targets through 2022. Additionally, gender-diverse and inclusive teams outperformed their less inclusive counterparts by 50%. AH: Once you’ve increased representation, what are ways to increase belonging?   WL: The first step any leader needs to take is self-awareness. If a leader doesn’t realize there is an opportunity to fix it, or that there’s something that can get better, it’ll never change.  Once the awareness is there, the leader needs to talk about it. The people who work in these dealerships are good—and I mean really good—salespeople. Good salespeople are driven by revenue, so talk to them in their language and explain how this impacts the bottom line.  Then, you need to measure the impact. Each organization needs to set its own KPIs, because it depends on the baseline and where they’re starting. But the ultimate question is: are you representative of the community you’re doing business in?  AH: Would you agree that sometimes this means looking beyond just the zip code in which you’re located, and being representative of all the zip codes from which prospective customers may come from? WL : Absolutely. Beyond just sales, think about the marketing impact this could have. Bringing together perspectives that are representative of your potential customers ensures that you’ll be more effective marketing to them, based on your team’s collective experiences and understanding of things like communication preferences.  This really ties back to your first question, because it shows how if we go with the linear definition of diversity and just count numbers, not much will change. But, if you intentionally seek to create a culture where people feel like they belong no matter what their background or experience is, and they know their voice is valued, there can be transformational impacts for your dealership. Your customers will feel the difference when they walk into your showroom.
Dealertrack DMS’ Lifetime Learning Portal Answers Industry Need for Customized, Comprehensive Training

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Salt Lake City — September 7, 2018 — As a lack of ongoing training continues to impact employee retention and overall profitability, dealerships nationwide are hard-pressed to reassess their employee programming strategies. According to a recent Cox Automotive dealership staffing study, only 54 percent of new hires in customer-facing roles said they received enough training to effectively do their jobs. To help dealerships address this enduring training gap, Dealertrack DMS, a Cox Automotive brand, is launching its Lifetime Learning Portal. With access to a variety of support channels, including event-based trainings, peer-to-peer support and online education, the Lifetime Learning Portal enables dealership personnel to tailor their training regimen to their own learning style. “Over the past couple of years, Dealertrack DMS has been honing its dealer-centric approach to ensure dealership personnel receive the superior training and education they need to get the most out of their DMS,” said Matt Hurst, Director of Client Services, Dealertrack DMS. “Want training in person? No problem. Prefer peer-to-peer? Click here. The Lifetime Learning Portal meets dealership personnel where they are and hosts content to fit all learning styles.” In 2017, Dealertrack DMS hosted DMS Edge , its first annual virtual training program, as well as the Dealertrack DMS Controller Conference, its first annual in-person training event. The following year, Dealertrack DMS took it one step further with the launch of DMS 360, the company’s new, peer-to-peer self-service portal where users can easily access support and share best practices across dealerships as well as with Dealertrack DMS team members online. Now, all of these resources, in addition to on-demand webinars, can be accessed in one place online, creating a more seamless learning experience that gives dealership personnel the opportunity to advance their DMS knowledge in a way that works best for them. “Dealertrack has put a focus on the users who rely on the DMS day in and day out,” said Robert Beaslin, Controller of Mark Miller Auto Group in Salt Lake City, Utah. “From peer-to-peer to webinars and virtual and in-person conferences, the brand’s Lifetime Learning programming has enabled our employees to get significantly more out of the existing DMS software, helping them to become more effective and successful in their roles at the dealership.” The next installment of Dealertrack DMS’ Lifetime Learning programming will be DMS Edge 2018, its second annual virtual user event series, running September 18 through September 21, 2018. Over the course of four days and 18 virtual sessions, DMS Edge will bring on-demand training and DMS best practices directly to thousands of dealership personnel online. “DMS Edge gives dealership personnel a chance to get an inside look at the DMS without ever having to leave their desk,” said Randy Kobat, Senior Vice President of Cox Automotive brands vAuto, HomeNet, Rebates & Incentives, and Dealertrack DMS. “Following the first annual DMS Edge series in 2017, which reached 3,500 users, this year’s event promises to take training to the next level to help dealerships maximize the value of the DMS and give them a competitive edge.” Keynote speakers for the event include Dealertrack’s VP of Operations John Grace, Google Automotive Retail Strategist Tim Mueller and tax expert Greg White. For dealership personnel unable to attend DMS Edge or for those with other learning preferences, DMS 360, along with additional trainings and webinars are available to users 24/7/365. For more information about DMS Edge, and to register for the virtual event, please visit here . About Dealertrack Dealertrack provides industry-leading software solutions that give dealerships and lenders the confidence to thrive in an ever-changing automotive market. The company’s integrated suite of powerful but easy-to-use products helps dealerships and their lending partners grow by increasing efficiency and improving decision-making. Dealertrack is part of the Cox Automotive family, a company that is transforming the way the world buys, sells and owns cars. Dealertrack — along with its unmatched network of dealership and lending partners — is improving the car buying experience by embracing the technologies that will shape the future of automotive retail. For more information about Dealertrack, visit www.dealertrack.com . About Cox Automotive Cox Automotive Inc. makes buying, selling and owning cars easier for everyone, while also enabling mobility services. The global company’s 34,000-plus team members and family of brands, including Autotrader®, Clutch Technologies, Dealer.com®, Dealertrack®, Kelley Blue Book®, Manheim®, NextGear Capital®, VinSolutions®, vAuto® and Xtime®, are passionate about helping millions of car shoppers, 40,000 auto dealer clients across five continents and many others throughout the automotive industry thrive for generations to come. Cox Automotive is a subsidiary of Cox Enterprises Inc., a privately-owned, Atlanta-based company with revenues exceeding $20 billion. www.coxautoinc.com Media Contact Alexa Reinfeld, MWWPR, areinfeld@mww.com
The Four Types of Objections That Derail Salespeople (and How to Deal With Them)

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Hoboken, NJ — August 28, 2018 — No may be a tiny word, but for salespeople, it's the most dreaded word in the English language. Nothing causes your heart to sink quite like an objection from a prospective customer. This is true not just because it presages a negative impact on your income, but also because it's incredibly painful to hear. It's no coincidence that "objection" rhymes with "rejection" — and the latter is one of the deepest, darkest, most primal human fears. Jeb Blount says there's no way to avoid objections. They're going to happen. What you can do is learn how to rise above the emotional disruption they cause and, hopefully, salvage the sale. "There are four types of objections you encounter in the sales process, and they occur at various points in the journey," notes Blount, author of the new book Objections: The Ultimate Guide for Mastering the Art and Science of Getting Past No (Wiley, June 2018, ISBN: 978-1-119-47738-9, $27.00). "They can stop a sale before it ever gets started, derail your efforts in the middle of the conversation, or shut down the deal at the end after weeks, even months, of hard work. "The good news is that when you arm yourself with an arsenal of turnaround frameworks, you can face these roadblocks and get past them so you can move onto the next stage," he adds. Here are the four types of objections salespeople must field, along with a few tactics to help you get in the door, shorten the sales cycle, increase pipeline velocity, avoid stalled deals, and, of course, close the sale. TYPE 1: Prospecting Objections Of all objections, these are the most severe. They're often harsh and cold, and at times, flat-out rejection. People are crazy busy and see little value in spending time with salespeople. Through a combination of reflex responses, brush-offs, and objections (RBOs), they do their best to get rid of you. For this reason, millions of salespeople treat prospecting like the plague and avoid interrupting prospects at any cost. However, if you want success in your sales career, then you've got to interrupt prospects. Know that you are going to get prospecting objections, and they will trigger your disruptive emotions. But it is possible to rise above your emotions and become effective at turning around prospecting objections. For RBOs during prospecting, deploy a simple but powerful three-step framework: Ledge. A ledge is a memorized, automatic response to perceived or real rejection that does not require you to think. Using a ledge gives your logical brain the moment it needs to catch up, rise above disruptive emotions, and gain control. Disrupt. Your prospect has been conditioned from hundreds of prospecting calls and expects you to act like every other salesperson. When they tell you no, they have an expectation for what you will most likely do next. To turn around your prospect's RBO, deliver a statement or question that disrupts this pattern and pulls the prospect toward you. For example, when they say they're busy, instead of arguing with them that you will take only a little bit of their time, disrupt their pattern by agreeing with them: That's exactly why I called; I figured you would be, and I want to find a time that's more convenient for you . Or, when they say, "I'm not interested," respond with: That makes sense. Most people aren't the first time I call, and that's exactly why we should meet. Ask. Here's where most prospecting RBO turnarounds fall apart. Many salespeople are hesitant to ask again. But you must control your emotions and ask again for what you want, without hesitation. When you ask, about half of the time they'll throw out another RBO — one that tends to be closer to the truth. Be prepared to turn it around and ask again. (Just don't fight. It isn't worth it. Once you get two RBOs, graciously move on and come back to them another day.) TYPE 2: Red Herrings A red herring is an irrelevant topic or issue that gets introduced into the conversation by a stakeholder that distracts you from your focus or diverts your attention from the objective of your sales conversation. A stakeholder, typically early in the conversation, will throw out a red herring — sometimes to challenge you, sometimes because they don't know what else to say, sometimes because it's their habitual behavior pattern, and sometimes because they have a valid concern or question. A red herring might be something like: "We are already in discussions with your competitor," or, "Just so you know, we're not buying anything from you today." Do not take the bait! You must avoid getting drawn in by red herring objections at all costs. When you chase red herrings, you blow up sales calls, skip steps in the sales process, hand control over to stakeholders, and become their puppet. Red herrings, managed poorly, are emotional hijackers that turn sales calls into train wrecks. Moving past red herrings requires massive emotional control, so you need a simple and habitual system that keeps you in control — PAIS: Pause, Acknowledge, Ignore, Save. Push the pause button and collect your emotions. Acknowledge and let the stakeholder know that you heard them. You might say: That makes sense or I get that or This sounds important . Ignore the red herring unless it comes up again, or... Save it and address at a later, more appropriate time. "My default is to ignore the red herring unless it comes up again, because I've learned, over a lifetime in the sales profession, that they almost never do," says Blount. "I acknowledge the concern, and my favorite way to do this is to simply take notes. Writing down what they say lets them know that I think it is important without getting pulled in. Then I ask an unrelated open-ended question that gets my stakeholder talking." TYPE 3: Micro-Commitment Objections Throughout the sales process, you'll ask stakeholders for next steps and micro-commitments. Micro-commitments are a series of low-risk commitments that lead down the path to a final buying commitment. Asking for them and consistently getting to the next step keeps the momentum rolling. You must never, ever leave a conversation with a stakeholder without a firm next step. Here's the problem: The people you are dealing with don't always see the value in spending more time with you, so they hit you with brush-offs to make you go away. The good news is micro-commitment objections are rarely harsh and, unless you totally bombed, are rarely outright rejection. For this reason, the key to getting past these objections is showing poise and confidence and helping your prospect see the value of scheduling the next step. Once you explain the value in a way that they understand, the prospect will agree to the next step. Value, however, is in the eye of the beholder. They want to know What's in it for me? — and you must answer that question. Step into your prospect's shoes and write down why it should matter to them. What is the value trade for investing more time with you? Then craft compelling value statements that articulate this in your stakeholder's language and terms. "Keep it simple," says Blount. "Remember that these are micro-commitments — small steps and low-risk requests. It's easy to get stakeholders to say yes. These value statements don't need to be profound or complex. They should not be pitchy. Avoid jargon that makes you sound like a marketing brochure. You don't need to be perfect — just good enough to get to the next step." TYPE 4: Buying Commitment Objections When you ask people to make buying decisions — sign contracts, hand over credit cards, issue POs, switch vendors, and accept your proposal — you will get objections. Getting past buying commitment objections is often the moment of truth that determines whether or not you will close the deal. The outcome pivots on your ability to gain control over your emotions, guide the conversation, and influence your stakeholder's emotions. Unlike prospecting objections and micro-commitment objections, the number of possible buying commitment objections isn't finite and predictable. They are situational. You'll deal with price and budget objections, timing objections, status quo objections, need to talk it over with my boss or committee objections, spouse objections, buying authority objections, competitor objections, need to think it over objections, need and fit objections, and terms and conditions objections, among others. Dealing with buying commitment objections requires nuance, patience, influence, and situational awareness. The process of getting past no becomes more collaborative and will seamlessly shift from objection to negotiation. The following five-step framework will help you gain emotional control and influence your buyer to say yes: Relate. Acknowledge and relate to the objection. Don't treat them like a number, discount their concern, challenge their point of view, judge them, or start an argument. Isolate and clarify. Ask questions to isolate the "real" objection, issue, or concern. Clarify your understanding before addressing it. The key here is to ask open-ended questions that get your buyer talking and expressing their real concerns. Minimize. Remind the stakeholder of their problems, pain, threats, opportunities, and the yesses you've collected. Ask. Ask again and assume the yes. Fall back to an alternative. If you still get a no, offer an alternative commitment with a lower perceived risk. Have your fallback positions planned prior to your closing call. "Practice the worst-case scenarios," says Blount. "Put every potential objection and response on the table and work through the five-step process until you handle them all with ease. I've found practice helps build obstacle immunity, prepares you to manage disruptive emotions, and makes it far easier to think on your feet, in the moment. When you plan and practice in advance, you'll find the actual objections you get at closing are far tamer than what you initially expected." None of the tips Blount offers (and there are many more in the book) are rigid scripts. That's because dealing with objections is more an art than a science. "I prefer to teach turnaround frameworks, not generic scripts, because frameworks make you agile," says Blount. They give you a set of rails to run on that flex to changing context. They help you manage your disruptive emotions and pull your prospect toward you so that it becomes easier for them to say yes — which is, of course, the salesperson's favorite word." About the Author Jeb Blount is the author of nine books and is among the world's most respected thought leaders on sales, leadership, and customer experience. As a sales acceleration specialist, he helps sales organizations reach peak performance fast by optimizing talent, leveraging training to cultivate a high-performance culture, developing leadership and coaching skills, and applying more effective organizational design. Through his global training organization, Sales Gravy, Jeb advises many of the world's leading organizations and their executives on the impact of emotional intelligence and interpersonal skills on customer-facing activities and delivers training to thousands of participants in both public and private forums. His flagship website, SalesGravy.com , is the most visited sales-specific website on the planet. About the Book Objections: The Ultimate Guide for Mastering the Art and Science of Getting Past No (Wiley, June 2018, ISBN: 978-1-119-47738-9, $27.00) is available at bookstores nationwide, from major online booksellers, and direct from the publisher by calling 800-225-5945. In Canada, call 800-567-4797. For more information, please visit the book's page on www.wiley.com . Media Contact Dottie DeHart, DeHart & Company Public Relations, (828) 325-4966
Back by Popular Demand, Compli and Fisher Phillips Team Up to Talk Termination During Second Webinar

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Portland, OR — June 12, 2018 — Compli, the automotive leader in HR and Compliance solutions, has announced their first employee termination webinar with Fisher Phillips was such a success, they will be bringing it back on July 31, 2018 at 11 a.m. Pacific, 2 p.m. Eastern. With the first event almost topping 3,000 registrants, Fisher Phillips’ Regional Managing Partner, Steve Roppolo, and Kynzie Sims, JD, CCEP of Compli, are back again to explore and review best practices for a termination program including before there is an issue when considering a termination, during the termination meeting, and after the termination meeting. “Unfortunately, terminating an employee is something every business has to deal with at some point in time,” said Sims. “The best way to protect yourself from a wrongful termination claim is to be prepared and ensure you follow all procedures to avoid costly fines. We’ll take you through the ins and outs of a termination meeting and give you best practices before, during and after the termination to mitigate your risk.” To reserve your webinar seat, click here. For those not able to attend the webinar, signing up will enable you to receive the recording via email. For additional termination resources from Compli, please click here. About Compli Compli provides a cloud-based solution that manages compliance activities across your workforce. Consolidate all of your compliance initiatives across your organization into one easy-to-use system for your employees and your managers. Deliver defensible proof of compliance to your auditors and executives to keep cool, calm, and compliant. For more information on Compli, please visit www.compli.com . Media Contact Laurie Halter, Charisma! Communications, 503-816-2474, Laurie@charismacommunications.com
Nicole Cockcroft Receives Cox Automotive Breakthrough Leader of the Year Award

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Atlanta — June 26, 2018 — Cox Automotive awarded its Breakthrough Leader of the Year Award to Nicole Cockcroft (pictured above at left, with Nicole Ashe of Cox Automotive), services and parts manager with Headquarter Mazda, part of Headquarter Automotive located in Clermont, Florida. This honor recognizes women leaders who were inspired to transition to the automotive industry from another industry and made an immediate impact in the day-to-day business. Cockcroft accepted the award at a ceremony during the Women in Automotive Conference in Orlando. She was selected from the top female nominees across the country, that met the criteria of having five years or less of automotive experience and making significant in-roads and measurable contributions to help advance her dealerships’ business. “Year after year, we find that diversity continues to be a catalyst for company growth and innovation,” said Nicole Ashe, senior vice president of talent, diversity and culture, Cox Automotive. “Cox Automotive is pleased to recognize Nicole as a premiere example of how a customer-centric background and can-do attitude can generate change not only for a dealership and the local community, but for the entire automotive industry.” Prior to joining the Headquarter Automotive family in 2014, Cockcroft worked as an administrative assistant, owner of a waterslide and moonwalk rental business, a medical transcriptionist and a server/bartender. At Headquarter Honda, Cockcroft began as a service advisor, where her customer service skills shined and helped her climb up the ladder. Soon after, Cockcroft became the parts and service manager for Headquarter Mazda. “I pleaded with Nicole to come work for us after appreciating her outstanding customer experience in the food service business,” said Michael Gippert, fixed operations director with Headquarter Automotive. “Despite her concerns about not knowing the industry, she took a chance with us and has never looked back.” It was Nicole’s resilience that really set her up to succeed, continued Gippert, who now manages Cockcroft. “In her second year, it became quite clear that she would be the natural choice to promote to service and parts manager of our brand-new Mazda store. Not only did she manage, she also coached and motivated others while exceeding her job expectations. What’s more, her former colleagues at Headquarter Honda were so upset that she was leaving them!” “Nicole and her team at our Mazda store are in the top 10% of CSI in the region and our retention is extremely high for a brand-new dealership,” said Judy Farcus Serra, CFO of Headquarter Automotive. “She possesses the skills, qualities and competencies that are truly remarkable. She has a tremendous future and our organization plans to continue to develop her and advance her career without boundaries.” When Cockcroft isn’t improving the business side of Headquarter Mazda, she supports her local community by volunteering at local schools and coaching softball. About Cox Automotive Cox Automotive Inc. makes buying, selling and owning cars easier for everyone. The global company’s 34,000-plus team members and family of brands, including Autotrader ® , Dealer.com ® , Dealertrack ® , Kelley Blue Book ® , Manheim ® , NextGear Capital ® , VinSolutions ® , vAuto ® and Xtime ® , are passionate about helping millions of car shoppers, 40,000 auto dealer clients across five continents and many others throughout the automotive industry thrive for generations to come. Cox Automotive is a subsidiary of Cox Enterprises Inc., a privately-owned, Atlanta-based company with revenues exceeding $20 billion. coxautoinc.com Media Contact Nick Singer | Account Executive, Technology | MWWPR | 415.580.6132 | 510.684.7112 (m) |  nsinger@mww.com
Keynote Women in Automotive Conference With Expert Panel Discussing Automotive News Project XX

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Jody Devere, Mary Beth Vander Schaff, Kynzie Sims, Julie Rodgers, and Candice Crane to Keynote Women in Automotive Conference With Expert Panel Discussing Automotive News Project XX Portland, OR — June 18, 2018 — Compli, the automotive leader in HR and compliance automation solutions, is honored to announce Kynzie Sims, Compli’s Content Product Manager, will join fellow powerhouse females: Mary Beth Vander Schaff, Managing Editor of Automotive News, Jody DeVere, CEO AskPatty.com and Founding Board Member of the Women in Automotive Conference, Julie Rodgers, Chief Operating Officer of Hireology, and Candace Crane, People Strategy, in an expert panel at the fifth annual Women in Automotive Conference , held June 24-26 in Orlando, Florida. The women on the panel will be discussing the implications of Automotive News’ Project XX survey findings that persistent sexism in the auto industry — an industry that says it wants and needs more female leaders — stalls careers and leaves women feeling unsafe. “What we resist persists. Having respectful, fearless dialogue and constructive discussion on controversial and uncomfortable issues like the topic of #TimesUp in the auto industry, as reflected in the Automotive News Project XX study, is healthy and necessary," said Jody DeVere, CEO of AskPatty.com and Founding Board Member of the Women in Automotive Conference. "This panel is designed to provide men and women with the vocabulary, terminology, solution-based strategies and tools to work together to ensure an industry-wide culture where all employees, regardless of gender, can thrive in their careers,” added DeVere. Titled “How We Fit In and Where We Go from Here,” panelists will be discussing implications of the survey results and how the industry as a whole can better support and nurture female empowerment and leadership. “This is one area that is currently top of mind for every company we consult with on the compliance side and it’s fraught with minefields,” said Kynzie Sims, JD, CCEP, Content Product Manager at Compli. “I’m honored to be on the panel and help attendees understand the ins and outs of this powerful movement, as well as provide support for the advancement of females in the automotive industry.” “Women account for only 1 in 5 dealership employees and to attract more women to open roles, the automotive industry needs to change the perception of what it's like to work for a dealership,” said Julie Rodgers, Chief Operating Officer at Hireology. “I'm excited to participate in this panel and share actionable steps dealers can take to attract more female employees and, as a result, create a stronger, more diverse workforce.” For more information on Compli, please visit www.compli.com . For more information, to register, or to become a sponsor for the convention, please visit www.WomeninAutomotive.com . About Compli Compli provides a cloud-based solution to manage HR and compliance programs across your dealership. Automate your compliance learning and business processes in one system to save time and money, while protecting your business so you stay cool, calm, and compliant. Media Contact Laurie Halter, Charisma! Communications, 503-816-2474, Laurie@charismacommunications.com